Department of Education Boundaries: District 14

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On Insideschools website, this is the given description of the New York Department of Education's District 14. The description goes on to list specific schools that decide admittance based on entrance exams, charter schools, and schools with dual-language programs.[25]

When an area begins to gentrify, one component at play is redefinition. There is a push to re-conceptualize what an area is, often with an image that excludes those in the neighborhood before. The redefining can go so far as to creating an entirely new name for a geographical boundary—a tactic that realtors love, as seen with neighborhoods such as SoHo. This practice has happened time and time again with different agents—look to Brownstoners’ naming of Cobble Hill after finding a reference to Cobble Hill Fort on old maps at the Long Island Historical Association or local businessmen’s naming of Carrol Gardens to distinguish themselves from the neighborhood of Red Hook.[26] Renaming is used as a tool to “create” neighborhoods where neighborhoods already exist. Redefinition takes place in other forms within neighborhoods as changes occur in realty marketing, businesses available, and the use of public spaces. In terms of education, school districts can take a parallel course in re-imagination.

Los Sures falls into New York City Department of Education’s District 14, which includes both the neighborhoods of Williamsburg and Greenpoint. While Los Sures is historically a neighborhood predominantly composed of communities identifying as Puerto Rican, Dominican, and working class, as Williamsburg has been marketed to “young professionals” and the area has become conceived as the “it” neighborhood, this composition has changed to more middle class to upper class and white. With this demographic shift, District 14—a district that online resources such as Insideschools, a project centered in the Center for New York City Affairs at The New School and maintained by "journalists, public school parents, and public school advocates,” noted a common trend of new families sending their children to “progressive schools in Manhattan's District 1”—is now defined as a district where “schools have adopted a more progressive approach and are attracting families new to the neighborhood.”[27]

Department of Education Boundaries: District 14